Month: March 2018

Ep. 21 Eva Leigh: Counting on a Countess

This week we’re joined by Eva Leigh, a historical romance novelist who also writes as Zoe Archer. Her latest release in her London Underground series is Counting on a Countess.

We discuss her four pen names, what it’s like to be married to another romance novelist, intersectional feminism, and historical orgies.
You can follow Zoe/Eva on Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, and Facebook or find her on her website.

Listen on Google Play Music

Ways to listen:

You can click the button in the banner on the right or this link to download (and subscribe!) on iTunes!

Or click the button above to access the show on Google Play. It’s also available on Stitcher, Spotify, or most other podcast apps!

Highlights from our conversation include:

  • Her intro to romance.
  • How and when she started writing romance.
  • What her earliest writing looked like at age 6.
  • How her heroines embody the fearlessness that she wishes she had.
  • What it’s like being married to a fellow romance author and how her husband, Nico, got his start writing romance. Check out Nico’s website!
  • What it’s like having two writers in their household.
  • How mindfulness can be useful for writers.
  • What it’s like juggling four pen names: Ami Silber, Zoe Archer, Eva Leigh, and Alexis Stanton.
  • Why writing romance is a feminist act.
  • Why work by women for women is so easily dismissed.
  • The importance of intersectional feminism.
  • Why it’s important to know when to shut up and listen to other people’s experiences.
  • How feminism is about choices and is not going to look the same for everyone.
  • Historical orgies and underground sex clubs and how she’ll be exploring that in the third London Underground book.

Books mentioned in this episode:

Counting on a Countess by Eva Leigh

Books by Jude Devereaux

Books by Johanna Lindsey

Skies of Gold by Zoe Archer

Taken to the Limit by Nico Rosso

Dare to Love a Duke by Eva Leigh

Persuasion by Jane Austen

The Perils of Pleasure by Julianne Long

Ep. 20 Jodi Ellen Malpas: With This Man

This week we’re joined by Jodi Ellen Malpas. She is the #1 New York Times and international bestselling author of the erotic This Man Trilogy and The One Night Trilogy, as well as several standalone novels.

In this episode we discuss what it was like to have This Man become an overnight success and her wild ride of a publishing journey from there. We also talk about adapting her novels for a Passionflix movie and TV series, the need for more full-frontal male nudity, and the casting process for her larger-than-life characters.
You can find JEM on Twitter, Facebook, or on her website!

Listen on Google Play Music
Ways to listen:

You can click the button in the banner on the right or this link to download (and subscribe!) on iTunes!

Or click the button above to access the show on Google Play. It’s also available on Stitcher, Spotify, or most other podcast apps!

Highlights from our conversation include:
  • The shame she experienced when she was first writing and reading romance, and how being in the romance industry has made her a more confident women.
  • When she first started writing, she was deeply unfulfilled by her marriage and job, so she wrote to fill a gap in her life.
  • How her marriage wasn’t strong enough to sustain her success.
  • How her initial success went along with a rough ride because she was bucking the traditional women’s roles in her family.
  • The differences between the way Americans and Brits handle success.
  • How she realized she was existing as a people pleaser and needed to finally do something for herself.
  • Why she’s about to jump back into some self publishing later this year.
  • What it’s like to have your books turned into TV/films.
  • Why we need more full frontal male nudity!
  • What we can look forward to from her going forward.
Books mentioned in this episode:

With This Man by Jodi Ellen Malpas

This Man by Jodi Ellen Malpas
The Forbidden by Jodi Ellen Malpas

The Protector by Jodi Ellen Malpas

Fifty Shades of Grey by E.L. James

Ep. 19 Kelly Bowen: A Duke in the Night

We’re joined this week by Kelly Bowen who is the RITA award winning author of historical romance including her Lords of Worth series, A Season for Scandal series, and her new Devils of Dover series. We discuss her new release (A Duke in the Night), her background in agriculture, and which body part was most crucial in selecting the cover of her latest book.

To find out more about Kelly and her books, you can check out her website or follow her on Twitter or Facebook.
Listen on Google Play Music
Ways to listen:

You can click the button in the banner on the right or this link to download (and subscribe!) on iTunes!

Or click the button above to access the show on Google Play. It’s also available on Stitcher, Spotify, or most other podcast apps!

Highlights from our conversation include:

  • How she ended up reading her very first romance novel.
  • Why working on farms meant that she didn’t feel any shame about the sex in romance novels.
  • The fabulously varied educational and work backgrounds of romance authors.
  • How her degrees in veterinary physiology and veterinary endocrinology have impacted her.
  • Her (sometimes hilarious) experiences in the male dominated field of agriculture–and how she enjoyed and was challenged by it.
  • How she parents her boys to have a healthy view towards women.
  • How the guys from the barn have been supportive and are a positive group to work with.
  • Why she loves the editing process and working with a team in publishing.
  • All about her new release, A Duke in the Night.
  • Margaret Anne Buckley who pretended to be a man and became a doctor.
  • Forearm porn and gorgeous cover models.
  • When King will be getting his own book.
  • Her adorable foster dog.

The variations of the cover of A Duke in the Night that we discussed:

wet

Books mentioned in this episode:

A Duke in The Night by Kelly Bowen

Last Night with the Earl by Kelly Bowen

A Knight in Shining Armor by Jude Devereaux

The Winter Sea by Susanna Kearsley

Lord of Darkness by Elizabeth Hoyt

Ep. 18 Grace Burrowes: A Rogue of Her Own

This week we’re joined by Grace Burrowes, a NYT and USA Today Bestselling author of historical and contemporary romance. We talk about her new book, A Rogue of Her Own, how her experience as a child welfare lawyer impacts her writing, and how writer’s block isn’t writer’s block at all–but a key part of the process.

You can find more from Grace on her wonderful website or follow her on Twitter or Facebook. She also loves emails from fellow writers.

 

Listen on Google Play Music
Ways to listen:

You can click the button in the banner on the right or this link to download (and subscribe!) on iTunes!

Or click the button above to access the show on Google Play. It’s also available on Stitcher, Spotify, or most other podcast apps!

Highlights from the conversation include:

  • How she got her introduction to romance novels and how she transitioned into writing them.
  • How her work as a child welfare lawyer has impacted her perspective and her writing.
  • Her hilarious query letter after being unsure at her first writers’ conference (and drinking a few more White Russians than usual).
  • That she still doesn’t consider herself a “Real Writer” and simply writes for joy.
  • How comparing your process to those of other successful writers can be overwhelming and not always helpful.
  • How she handles reader expectations.
  • The temptation to write nonfiction about her experiences as a child welfare attorney and single mom to share some of the unique perspectives she has.
  • How A Rogue of Her Own has many modern connections for the situations that women find themselves in.
  • How the defining traumas that women face have a sad amount of overlap between the Regency era and today.
  • Why she regards romance as centrally humanist rather than feminist.
  • Her advice to aspiring writers: Always continue working on your craft. Write what you love and what is authentic to you.
  • Her interesting views on writer’s block: that it may not be writer’s block at all, but a natural part of the creative process.
  • The ridiculous structures we try to impose on a creative process that for many people stifles rather than fosters creativity.
  • How to keep a balance between the industry and the artist.
  • How as she gets older, she feels that her identity is less obscured by cultural roles that were imposed upon her.

Books mentioned in this episode:

A Rogue of Her Own by Grace Burrowes

The Wolf and the Dove by Kathleen Woodiwiss

The Flame and the Flower Kathleen Woodiwiss

Books by Johanna Bourne

Books by Mary Balogh

The Black Hawk by Joanna Bourne

Ep. 17 Jennifer Prokop: Representation in Romance

In this episode, we’re joined by Jennifer Prokop, perhaps better known as @JenReadsRomance on Twitter. She’s an avid romance reader and reviewer, and teaches middle school English, so she has a knack for breaking complex concepts down in a way that makes them easier to grasp. We discuss representation in romance, how to be better allies, and how uncomfortable but necessary these conversations are.

Jen also reviews romance for The Book Queen’s Book Palace. Some of our favorite posts from her are:

Who Did it Better…In an Elevator

Who Did it Better…On a Horse

Listen on Google Play Music
Ways to listen:

You can click the button in the banner on the right or this link to download (and subscribe!) on iTunes!

Or click the button above to access the show on Google Play. It’s also available on Stitcher, Spotify, or most other podcast apps!

Highlights from our conversation include:

  • Witnessing the joyful epiphany her students experience when they see themselves represented in fiction.
  • How to respond to kids who learn to assign gender to things like books and reject them on that basis. “Books don’t have genitals!”
  • The Big 8 social identifiers and how they play out in fiction.
  • Why terms like “privilege” make white people so uncomfortable.
  • If we’re comfortable feeling historical pride, why can’t we also get comfortable with historical shame?
  • Strategies for explaining and handling these concepts to kids.
  • The metaphor of windows vs mirrors for readers and why “window books” can be the most exciting as a reader if you approach them with an open mind. With an open heart, all books can be both windows and mirrors because you can find something to relate to in the authentic human experience.
  • Why white, American, cishet, able-bodied women basically never have to think about representation when they’re reading–and why that can be problematic.
  • How harmful the “stealing our jobs” rhetoric is and how it stems from white fragility.

Books mentioned in this episode:

Nurture Shock: New Thinking About Children by PO Bronson and Ashley Merryman

Books by Alyssa Cole

Books by Alisha Rai

Books by Colson Whitehead

Books by Talia Hibbert

Books by Melissa Blue